These 10 Little Known Hot Springs In Alaska Will Completely Relax You

We’re just going to go on record and say that the fact that Alaska stays moderately “chilly” most of the year is actually totally awesome. Sure, the allure of hot sun and white sandy beaches might do it for some people, but we’d sacrifice that hot weather for our perfectly mild temps any day of the week – especially since it will definitely make enjoying these ten little-known hot springs that much more comfortable, relaxing and completely rejuvenating. Check them out!

10. Kilo Hot Springs in the Ray Mountains.


Once you make the hike in, it is truly like something straight out of a peaceful, relaxing dream. Watch the video above and get excited to add this incredible destination to your Alaska bucket list!

Some other great hot springs in Alaska include Chief Shakes Hot Springs in Wrangell, Goddard Hot Springs in Sitka, and Tolovana Hot Springs on Mile 93 of the Elliott Highway. Do you love exploring all of the amazing things and natural wonders that the last frontier has to offer? Check out these 13 once-in-a-lifetime adventures that you can ONLY have in Alaska!

Address: Baranof, Sitka, AK 99835, USA
Address: Chena Hot Springs Road, Chena Hot Springs Rd, Alaska 99712, USA
Address: Kanuti River, Alaska, USA
Address: Manley Hot Springs, AK 99756, USA
Address: Serpentine Hot Springs, AK 99772, USA
Address: Chichagof Island, Alaska, USA
Address: Pilgrim Hot Springs, Kougarok Rd, AK, USA
Address: Ketchikan, AK 99901, USA
The OIYS Visitor Center

Hot Springs in Alaska

February 15, 2022

How many natural hot springs in Alaska are there?  

The U.S. Geological Survey places at least 79 natural thermal springs in the state of Alaska. Many of them are much too hot for people to swim or soak in, but others are absolutely perfect. You’ll find springs that are developed – that is, folks have built resorts or retreats or campgrounds or anything else up around them – and undeveloped, meaning they’re wild and free (and a little risker). If you’re a fan of the former, visit resorts like Chena Hot Springs, in Fairbanks, which might just be Alaska’s most popular hot springs resort, and make sure you also check out Manley Hot Springs. If you prefer your hot springs undeveloped and just as nature made them, some of your options include Akutan Hot Springs, Baranof Warm Springs, and many more. Some of the undeveloped hot springs in Alaska require a hike to reach them, which cuts down on traffic so you’re more likely to have the springs to yourself. For a list of some of those epic hot springs hikes in Alaska, check this article out.  

What is winter in Alaska like?  

Well, to put it lightly: it’s a bit chilly. Frigid, even. Average winter daytime temperatures range from 0 to –30 degrees Fahrenheit, which is well below freezing. Coastal areas tend to be cloudy and droll at wintertime, though the landscape itself is utterly splendid all year-’round. The state receives about 64.46 inches of snow annually, which is significantly more than the United States average of right around 28 inches. Snowstorm events where more than five inches of snow falls in a days’ time occur about four or five times per season, and ice storms occasionally strike as well. Winter can be a perilous time of year for those who fail to properly prepare for it. The extreme cold might make life a little more inconvenient, but we’ll also be the first to say that few things are quite as lovely as the Alaskan wilderness coated in a layer of fluffy fresh snow. 

Address: Baranof, Sitka, AK 99835, USA
Address: Chena Hot Springs Road, Chena Hot Springs Rd, Alaska 99712, USA
Address: Kanuti River, Alaska, USA
Address: Manley Hot Springs, AK 99756, USA
Address: Serpentine Hot Springs, AK 99772, USA
Address: Chichagof Island, Alaska, USA
Address: Pilgrim Hot Springs, Kougarok Rd, AK, USA
Address: Ketchikan, AK 99901, USA