Take A Thrilling Road Trip To The 8 Most Abandoned Places In Oregon

There’s something undeniably alluring about abandoned places in Oregon. Not only do they hold significant historical value, but they also remind us of days gone by. Seeing how nature has slowly reclaimed some of these once-important landmarks is both haunting and beautiful. With that in mind, we’ve created an itinerary for exploring some of the most abandoned places in Oregon. From ghost towns to shipwrecks, this road trip adventure will take you to some truly fascinating destinations.

The trip takes roughly 9 hours of driving and can be spread out over as many days and nights as you’d like. Customize your itinerary using this Google Map.

We’re aware that these uncertain times are limiting many aspects of life as we all practice social and physical distancing. While we’re continuing to feature destinations that make our state wonderful, we don’t expect or encourage you to go check them out immediately. We believe that supporting local attractions is important now more than ever and we hope our articles inspire your future adventures! And on that note, please nominate your favorite local business that could use some love right now: https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/nominate/

What are your thoughts on this road trip to Oregon’s most abandoned places? Be sure to share your thoughts with us in the comments below! For more eerily fascinating places, check out the Oregon Ghost Towns Road Trip.

Address: 1675 Peter Iredale Rd, Hammond, OR 97121, USA
Address: Peter Iredale Rd, Hammond, OR 97121, USA
Address: 1001 E Bridge St, Vernonia, OR 97064, USA
Address: Lower Macleay Trail, Portland, OR 97210, USA
Address: White River Falls State Park, Maupin, OR 97037, USA
Address: Shaniko, OR 97037, USA
Address: Kent, OR, USA
Address: Fort Rock, OR 97735, USA
The OIYS Visitor Center

Abandoned Places In Oregon

April 21, 2020

What is the most famous abandoned place in Oregon?

As you can tell from the above road trip, there are several fascinating abandoned places in Oregon. Yet of all of these places, the abandoned town of Shaniko truly stands out. When it was incorporated in 1901, Shaniko was actually the fifth largest city in Wasco County. As the Wool Capital of the World, Shaniko would ship millions of pounds of wool and livestock to market each year. Many considered the town to be second only to Portland in importance to the local economy. The boom lasted only ten years and the population declined after a competing railway line was built from Deschutes River Canyon to Bend.

What is the most haunted place in Oregon?

It’s no surprise that a state as historic as Oregon would also have a handful of haunted landmarks. Among the most famous is the Geiser Grand Hotel. The accommodation was primarily built for wealthy miners in the 1880s and also attracted the attention of gamblers. By the 1960s, the hotel had fallen into disrepair and wouldn’t be restored and reopened until the 1990s. By that time, however, it seemed as though many of the hotel’s original guests had yet to leave; reports of apparitions, paranormal activity, and general feelings of discomfort remained. Today, it’s considered to be a top haunted place in Oregon.

Can I go ghost hunting in Oregon?

It’s possible to explore some of the most haunted places in Oregon when you sign up for a ghost hunting tour. There are several offered throughout the state, most of which take place in Portland. These nightly walking tours take curious guests to some of Portland’s paranormal hot spots, including the Merchant Hotel.

Address: 1675 Peter Iredale Rd, Hammond, OR 97121, USA
Address: Peter Iredale Rd, Hammond, OR 97121, USA
Address: 1001 E Bridge St, Vernonia, OR 97064, USA
Address: Lower Macleay Trail, Portland, OR 97210, USA
Address: White River Falls State Park, Maupin, OR 97037, USA
Address: Shaniko, OR 97037, USA
Address: Kent, OR, USA
Address: Fort Rock, OR 97735, USA