Hoh Rain Forest, Washington: Discover An Emerald Oasis & The Quietest Square Inch In America

Washington is the very best cure for wanderlust — but it might also ignite an insatiable appetite for exploring, too. The Evergreen State has some of the most stunning parks in the country, and Olympic National Park is its crown jewel. By the numbers, Olympic National Park is 922,651 acres of pure beauty, with over 3,000 miles of rivers and streams, 1,200 types of native plants, 300 avian inhabitants, 73 miles of coastline, 60 glaciers, and 56 mammal species (including 22 listed as endangered or threatened). Its magnitude and presence are formidable. But statistics aside, Olympic National Park is an absolutely inspiring place to visit; it’s a Washington wonderland with one of the most diverse ecosystems and geographies in the world. It’s brimming with the soul-filling joy that only nature can provide. And there’s one place within Olympic National Park – Hoh Rain Forest – that’s the most transcendent and revelatory of all.

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Hoh Rain Forest is one of Washington’s most glorious natural wonders, and it’s truly a place everyone should experience. Read more about Hoh Rain Forest, and Olympic National Park, at their respective pages on the National Parks Service website.

Accessibility: The Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is wheelchair accessible, and there is a 0.1-mile, paved, accessible-with-assistance loop at the Visitor Center. The Hall of Mosses Trail and Spruce Nature Trail are unpaved, with less than 100 feet in elevation gain along their respective routes.

Pet-Friendly: Pets, with the exception of service animals, are not allowed on trails within Hoh Rain Forest.

Parking: Parking is available at the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center & campground, though spaces are limited and can fill up quickly during the summer months.

Seasonal Access: While the trails are open year-round, the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is closed from January through early March. It is open daily during the summertime and on Friday through Sunday during the spring and fall seasons. Hours vary by season; for more information, click here.

Cost: The entrance fee for Olympic National Park is $30 per vehicle ($25 per motorcycle) or $15 per individual entering on foot or by bicycle; however, these passes are good for seven consecutive days, so you may explore Hoh Rain Forest and the surrounding park at your leisure. Additional charges apply for overnight camping fees.

If visiting this beautiful treasure has you inspired to indulge your wanderlust, this scenic road trip will take you to all seven wonders of Washington.

Feeling inspired to fill your Bucket List? Check out our previous feature of Ruby Falls in Tennessee and subscribe to our weekly Bucket List newsletter to discover new destinations across the country that definitely deserve a visit.

Address: 5629-4911 Upper Hoh Rd, Forks, WA 98331, USA