The Chilling Tale Of The Ill-Fated SS Morro Castle, New Jersey’s Ghost Ship

On September 8, 1934, the SS Morro Castle (an American ocean liner) caught fire and was beached along the shore of Asbury Park. Over 130 passengers and crew members died on that fateful day but there’s more to the story than a fire on a boat.

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The charred boat remained for months until finally being hauled away in March of 1935. It became something of a morbid tourist attraction. It drew significant attention for several reasons. First, the series of tragedies surrounding the ship. Second, the mysterious circumstances behind the captain’s death and the fire. Third, the fact that the ship beached in nearly the exact same spot as the New Era wrecked in 1854. Hundreds also died in that disaster. Today, visitors still flock to the spot where the ship hit the shore. Some report hearing screams, shadowy figures in the sand, and spotting a ghost ship in the water. If you want to learn more about the SS Morro Castle, visit the New Jersey Maritime Museum. It offers the largest collection of Morro Castle information and memorabilia, among other unique artifacts.