This Haunted Road Trip Will Lead You To The Scariest Places In Maryland

There’s a chill in the air. If you’re a lover of all things spooktacular then you may want to check out this ghostly road trip in Maryland. It will lead you to nine spots in the Old Line State that are known for frightening spirits and urban legends. Are you brave enough to visit the most haunted places in Maryland? Check out the following list to find out.

Click here to follow along with the Google Map.

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How many of these scary places in Maryland have you already been to? What are your favorite Maryland ghost stories? If you’d like to check out a few spooky spots around the Eastern Shore, click here.

The OIYS Visitor Center

Most Haunted Places In Maryland

August 22, 2019

What is the most famous ghost story from Maryland?

The most famous Maryland ghost story takes place at “Crybaby Bridge.” This spooky landmark is located in Prince George’s County, and some say it’s haunted by the ghost of an infant. Several legends surround this creepy place. In one version, the baby’s mother is hit by a car and drops the child overboard. In another version, the mother is overtaken by postpartum depression and intentionally drowns the baby in the water. No matter what macabre story you believe, there’s no doubt about the sinister energy surrounding this place. 

What is the most haunted town in Maryland?

Chestertown is one of the most haunted towns in Maryland. This little city is home to St. Paul’s Cemetery, and there’s been reports of excessive paranormal activity here. The graveyard dates all the way back to the 1700s, and numerous Confederate and Union soldiers are buried here. Several people have reported seeing the ghost of Revolutionary War officer Tench Tilghman standing along the bridge near the cemetery. Other reports claim you can hear the voice of deceased actress Tallulah Bankhead through her tombstone. 

What is the creepiest abandoned place in Maryland?

Forest Haven Asylum, located in Fort Meade, is the creepiest abandoned place in Maryland. This building once served the mentally ill children of The District of Columbia. In the late ‘60s, however, funding was cut and the care took a turn for the worse. Staff members often abused patients, and soon the children started dying from neglect. The children were buried in unmarked graves near the facility, and people claim to hear their anguished moans to this day. All that remains are tattered walls and decrepit furniture. If you decide to explore this area for yourself, be wary. This is not for the faint of heart.