Have you ever heard about the Underground Railroad in Cleveland? Following the opening of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Cleveland became a major player in the Underground Railroad. The city was codenamed “Hope,” and it was an important destination for escaped slaves on their way to Canada. Today, some of the city’s most notable stops on the Underground Railroad still stand, and they’re well worth a visit.

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Northeast Ohio is overflowing with history, and much of it is preserved in local legend. If walls could talk, the stories we’d hear of the Cleveland Underground Railroad would be incredible. Few conductors ever kept records or notes hinting at their activities, so many sites on the Underground Railroad and the true number of how many fugitives they assisted remain a bit of a mystery.

What is your favorite historical site in Ohio? Tell us in the comments!

Love wading through the secrets of local history? Check out our article on unusual facts about Cleveland to learn more!

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Historic and Beautiful Ohio

What are the oldest attractions in Ohio?

Settled in 1788, Ohio has had quite a bit of history. Here are some of the oldest attractions in Ohio:

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museum: Located in Fremont, you can visit the 19th president’s former home which is now a museum.

Lanterman’s Mill: The gristmill on this site was first built in 1845. Although the current one is now the third here, it still runs today, grinding wheat, buckwheat, and corn.

Newark Earthworks: Located in Heath, you can see earthworks that were constructed between 100 B.C. and 500 A.D. by the Hopewell culture.

What are the most beautiful places in Ohio?

 There is a lot to see within the Buckeye State’s 44,825 square miles. Here are some of the most beautiful places in Ohio:

Hocking Hills Park: Located in Logan, this 2,000-acre park is full of gorgeous waterfalls and caves. Check them out via 59 miles of trails. You can also camp here or attend one of the many events held throughout the year.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park: This is the state’s only national park. Among its over 50 square miles, its most popular (and beautiful) attractions include Brandywine Falls and Ledges Trail.

Ohio Caverns: Over in West Liberty, you can head underground and take in two miles of caverns. It is estimated that an underground river helped formed it thousands of years ago. Today, you can take in the unique crystal formations, stalactites, and stalagmites for yourself.

What is the oldest city in Ohio? 

Established in 1788, the city of Marietta in Washington County is the oldest in the state. And while it has been quite some time since it was first founded, the town keeps its history alive. You can tour the home of one of its founders, Rufus Putnam at the Campus Martius Museum. And within the town’s downtown area, you view historic buildings while you shop and dine. Other must-sees activities in Marietta include the Ohio River Museum, the historic Lafayette Hotel, Mound Cemetery, and much more.