Have you ever wondered, “What is the oldest town in Oklahoma?” Well, Fort Gibson might be a popular lake destination town today but it began as a military base in 1824, making it the oldest town in Oklahoma. Military families and Native Americans wanting military protection made roots in this small town due to its safety measures and location. It was the furthest town west that served as a military post so it was a very important base for the US army. The army abandoned the town in 1857 and then returned to it during the American Civil War. As you can imagine, Fort Gibson is loaded with a fascinating history and there’s even a historical site that is open to the public so you can see first-hand what life was like in the early days.

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If you ou ever wondered, “What is the oldest town in Oklahoma,” now you know. Fort Gibson not only is the oldest town in Oklahoma but it also had the first telephone, the first drama theater, and the first school for the blind in the state.

If you love nature but not the crowds, head to Sequoyah State Park on the shores of Fort Gibson Lake. This state park is not as crowded as other state parks in Oklahoma, so you’ll practically have it all to yourself. It’s a haven for nature lovers and the perfect place to enjoy the great outdoors in a serene and relaxing environment. And if you want to learn about another one of the oldest towns in Oklahoma, check out Guthrie.

Looking for a place to stay in Fort Gibson? Take a look at The Cottage on Walnut on VRBO, and make a reservation!

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