Grand Teton National Park: A Wyoming Wonder In The Jackson Hole Valley

Every year, millions of people travel to Wyoming to visit Yellowstone National Park. While the nation’s first National Park certainly deserves all of the attention that it gets, plenty of people walking the boardwalks and watching the geysers don’t realize that they’re just a few miles away from another world of wonders – Grand Teton National Park.

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Accessibility: All lodges, except for the Grand Teton Climber’s Ranch, offer some accessible rooms or cabins. Gros Ventre, Jenny Lake, and Colter Pay campgrounds are on flat terrain that should be navigable for visitors with mobility impairments. All three of the above campgrounds also offer partially accessible bathroom facilities. There are several accessible trails and the park is continually working on improving access to the natural beauty in the area for all. For more information, view the park’s accessibility guide here.

Pet Friendly: While we love to travel with our pets, Grand Teton National Park is not the best place to bring your pup. If you must bring your dog along, be aware that they have to stay within 30 feet of roadways at any given time, be leashed, and cannot be left unattended. Additionally, no dogs are allowed on park trails or in park waters. For more details, visit the park’s pet regulations page here.

Parking: Parking areas at popular trailheads may fill up, but there are improved lots at most of the visitor centers and facilities. Additionally, the park’s main roads offer multiple scenic turnout viewpoints, where you can park and take in the most iconic sights.

Seasonal Access: The park is open 24/7 all year long, but amenities and services are limited from November through April. In the winter, all campgrounds and most visitor centers are closed, and the main road through the park is only open to snowshoe and ski traffic. Most visitors plan their trip between May and September. 

Cost: Grand Teton National Park charges an entrance fee. For private cars, the cost is $35. For motorcycles, it’s $30, and for anyone arriving on foot or by bicycle, the fee is $20. Your pass is good for seven consecutive days from purchase. Yellowstone National Park charges a separate entrance fee as well, and visitors to both parks are encouraged to purchase an annual National Parks pass

Feeling inspired to fill your Bucket List? Check out our previous features of Havasu Falls, Molokini Crater, and the beautiful Shenandoah National Park, then subscribe to our weekly Bucket List newsletter to discover new destinations across the country that definitely deserve a visit.

Address: 103 Headquarters Rd, Moose, WY 83012, USA