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There’s Something Special About These 27 Vermont Farms From The Past

Vermont was certainly not immune to the impact and effects of Great Depression. Rural communities and those tied to agriculture likewise suffered the consequences of a nationwide and worldwide depression, but in different ways than the urban communities and the marble business. Some say that Vermont’s subsistence farming and small local markets had changed so little over time that farmers hardly noticed the Depression, while others insist that agriculture suffered enormously.

Income from the sale of fluid milk, Vermont’s most important agricultural product, dropped more than half from 1929 to 1933, in some places to 2.67 cents per quart—far less than the cost to the farmer for feed and equipment. The decline in demand for agricultural products that farmers had used to supplement their incomes, such as potatoes and lumber, further reduced agricultural workers’ purchasing power to its lowest level since 1877. Many farmers sold out—more than 1,500 farms went out of business in the decade after the Great Crash of 1929, putting much of the land out of cultivation, and by 1930 the proportion of unimproved farmland had risen to 60 percent.

What allowed many Vermonters to survive in both rural and urban areas during this time were the skills and tradition of self-reliance, combined with cooperation, bartering, and sharing resources. We’re proud to have maintained those values throughout the decades!  Here are 27 photos of people and places in Vermont that give us a glimpse of history.

We hope you have enjoyed these pictures of the people and places in Vermont as they showed resilience and determination to withstand the farming industry in Vermont during the Great Depression. Let us know if you like these historical slices of Vermont!

Kristin Grimes
Kristin Grimes lives in Vermont, is a freelance writer and busy MOM (Manager of Madness) and WIFE (Washing, Ironing, Feeding, Etc.)