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Most People Have No Idea There’s An Underwater Graveyard Hiding In South Carolina

Lake Jocassee in South Carolina’s beautiful Upstate, is a recreational lover’s dream. This lush, 7,500-acre lake is one of the most beautiful spots in the world, according to a 2012 ranking by National Geographic that named the Jocassee Gorges #9 on the list of “50 Of The World’s Last Great Places.”

But Lake Jocassee, in all its wonder, has a few secrets. When Duke Power built Jocassee Dam and then filled this lake, there were some things that didn’t get moved or torn down. The Attakulla Lodge, for one. It served as a place for travelers to the Jocassee Valley to stay while on their journeys, and later as a girls camp. Camp at Attakulla Lodge has been cancelled every summer since the lodge was submerged in more than 100 feet of water, more than 40 years ago.

Mt. Carmel Cemetery suffered the same fate. You may recognize this cemetery as the one made famous in the film Deliverance. Obviously the scenes filmed for this movie were shot before the reservoir was filled. Mt. Carmel Cemetery now lies at the bottom of Lake Jocassee, an eerie reminder of the sacrifices made by the people who once occupied the Jocassee Valley.

Watch now as a diver explores this underwater graveyard. It’s both peaceful and disturbing at the same time. And if you look closely enough you can even make out some names on the headstones.

Then, watch a compilation of home movies taken in the Jocassee Valley from 1958-1960 long BEFORE the filling of Lake Jocassee.

South Carolina is blessed with so much to see and do. The Jocassee Gorges area is one of the most unique and beautiful spots in the Palmetto State. Were you aware of the history of the Jocassee Valley and that people lived there before the man-made Jocassee Lake was created? We’d love to know in our comments.

If you like exploring South Carolina by way of videos you’ll love what this drone footage caught in South Carolina.

 

Robin Jarvis
Robin Jarvis is a staff writer for OnlyInYourState.com. She's traveled to five of the seven continents and currently lives 35-feet in the air in a treehouse in the Southeastern U.S. When she's not writing, she's dreaming of her next trip.