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What This Drone Footage Caught In Mississippi Will Drop Your Jaw

Nothing short of magnificent, the Windsor Ruins are quite the sight; thanks to this drone footage, which was produced by Rick Guy for Jackson Jambalaya, we can see the renowned ruins from a whole new angle.

One of the state’s most recognizable landmarks, the Windsor Ruins has been attracting locals and tourists alike for years now. The mansion was originally built for local planter, Smith Coffee Daniell II, and is the largest antebellum Greek Revival mansion in the state. Construction on the mansion began in 1859 and was completed in 1861. Set in the middle of a sprawling 2,600-acre plantation, Windsor included opulent features such as cast iron Corinthian column capitals, 25 fireplaces (one for each room), a fourth floor ballroom, rooftop observatory, and indoor plumbing. The total cost of constructing Windsor was approximately $175,000, which is $3.5 million in today’s money. Sadly, Daniell was only able to enjoy his lavish home for a short period of time as he passed away just a few weeks after moving into Windsor.

During the Civil War, the mansion was used by the Union and Confederacy. Windsor’s rooftop observatory was vital to the Confederacy as signaling equipment made it possible to warn other troops of Yankee advances. Eventually, the home was used as a Union hospital and observation post. It is most likely because of Windsor’s role in the war that the mansion was spared from being burned by Union troops like so many other structures of the time.

Once the war was over, the home became a popular spot for social gatherings, and attracted some notable guests, including Mark Twain. In 1890, Windsor was destroyed by a fire, which was reportedly caused by a guest that dropped a lit cigarette. Today, all that is left of the once massive mansion is 23 of the 29 columns, cast iron stairs (which have been relocated), and a few pieces of cast iron balustrade.

Daniella DiRienzo
Even though she was born in New York, Daniella has lived in the south pretty much her entire life. The self-proclaimed southerner graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2011. Since graduation, she has worked as a freelance writer for several websites and opened a clothing consignment shop in her town of Picayune, MS.