menu search

What’s Left Of This Arkansas Ghost Town Will Send Shivers Down Your Spine

The town of Rush once had a population of 22,000, making it the second-largest city in Arkansas during its heyday. Silver and zinc were discovered there in 1882, and Rush became a thriving mining town as peopled rushed to find jobs there, to set up shops and capitalize on the sudden growth. In 1883, a 13,000 pound piece of zinc was discovered there. It was record-breaking at the time, and it was shipped to the Chicago World’s Fair for exhibition. After the 1921 recession and subsequent collapse in ore prices, the town shriveled up and died. Its people left to find better prospects in other towns. The railroad got within six miles of Rush, and might have saved it, but alas, the railroad’s progress was halted by the collapse of Rush’s economy.

What remains at Rush today is a stunning set of ruins, all dating from between 1880 and 1940. The town was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1987, which has prevented its demolition all these years. The images from Rush are truly chilling.

 

Click here for a map to the ghost town.

For the most haunted hotel in Arkansas, try this article.

To find the creepiest road in Arkansas, click here.

J.B. Weisenfels
J.B. Weisenfels has lived in rural Arkansas for three decades. She is a writer, a mom, and a graduate student. She is also an avid collector of tacky fish whatnots, slightly chipped teapots, and other old things. In her spare time she enjoys driving to the nearest creek to sit a while. If you were to visit her, she'd try to feed you cornbread.